Viser søkeresultater 1 til 3 av 3
  1. #1
    Medlem siden
    Apr 2005
    Sted
    Hordaland
    Alder
    59
    Meldinger
    802

    Standard Binyre symptomer

    Tenkte jeg skulle samle litt av den informasjonen jeg har lett fram om binyreproblemer kombinert med lavt stoffskifte. Flott hvis andre også kan bidra!

    P.S. Jeg har oversatt teksten til norsk lenger ned i tråden!


    1. SYMPTOMER

    Først noen sitater fra Mary Shomon's bok "Living Well with Hypothyroidism" (HarperResource, New York 2005 (2. utg.) - ISBN 0-06-074095-7 - paperback):

    - The Adrenal Connection (side 240-43)
    One common condition that frequently accompanies hypothyroidism - and may even prevent proper treatment if it is not addressed itself - is adrenal exhaustion, also known as adrenal fatigue.

    (...)

    Adrenal fatigue often develops after periods of intense or lengthy physical or emotional stress, when overstimulation of the glands leaves them unable to meet your body's needs. (...) Symptoms include:

    • Excessive fatigue and exhaustion
      Nonrefreshing sleep (you get sufficient hours of sleep, but wake fatigued)
      A feeling of not being restored after a full night's sleep or having sleep disturbances
      Feeling overwhelmed by or unable to cope with stressors
      Feeling run down or overwhelmed
      Craving salty or sweet foods
      Feeling most energetic in the evening
      Low stamina, slow to recover from exercise
      Slow recovery from injury, illness, or stress
      Difficulty concentrating, brain fog
      Poor digestion
      Low immune function
      Food or environmental allergies
      Premenstrual syndrome or difficulties that develop during menopause
      Consistent low blood pressure
      Extreme sensitivity to cold
      Lack of sex drive
      Dark circles under the eyes
      Lines of dark pigment in the nails
      Startling easily
      No stamina for confrontation


    Interestingly, one of the most common symptoms, according to some practitoners, is a lack of response to thyroid hormone replacement in people with hypothyroidism.

    At his website - www.drrind.com - Dr. Bruce Rind, an expert on the thyroid-adrenal connection, has a helpful chart called the Metabolic Scorecard: Symptom Matrix with more information on adrenal symptoms. Dr. Rind feels that hypothyroidism and adrenal problems are very interrelated. Says Rind:
    I've found that one of the strongest stressors to the adrenals is thyroid hormone (specifically T3). The body is designed so that under normal conditions, one organ will not destroy another. The thyroid energy is allowed to rise only to a level that will not harm the adrenals. Thus, in a stress situation, the tolerance of the adrenals usually drops and we see a corresponding drop in T3. Conversely, if fatigued adrenals just started to receive support (e.g., nutrients favorable to adrenal health, drastic reduction in stress, or even a very joyful situation) we see a rapid rise in T3. I find that most people with history of Grave's disease or Hashimoto's Thyroiditis demonstrate weakened adrenals. Thus, the success of the thyroid therapy is limited by the health of the adrenals.

    (...)

    -------------------------------------
    Her er det som står om det samme temaet i Richard L. Shames og Karilee Halo Shames' bok "Thyroid Power - 10 Steps to Total Health" (HarperResource, New York, 2002 (2. utg.) - ISBN 0-06-008222-4 - paperback):

    The Thyroid-Adrenal Connection (s. 132)
    A major connection exists between low thyroid and low adrenal. Low adrenal, also called adrenal insufficiency, can actually cause someone's thyroid problem to be much worse than it would be otherwise.

    Crucial Reasons for Knowing Your Adrenal Levels (s. 133-134)
    Adrenal insufficiency symptoms include: weakness, lack of libido, allergies, dark circles under the eyes, muscle and joint pain, dizziness, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, food and salt cravings, poor sleep, dry skin, cystic breasts, lines of dark pigment in the nails, difficulty recuperating from stresses such as colds or jet lag, no stamina for confrontation, tendency to startle easily, lowered immune function, anxiety, depression, and premature aging. Some of these symptoms are similar to those of low thyroid.

    If low thyroid people with these symptoms are put on thyroid hormone alone, they sometimes respond negatively. They may have coexistent but hidden low adrenal. If they take thyroid hormone by itself, the resultant increased metabolism may accelerate the low adrenal problem. The proper approach in this case is to treat the patient with thyroid and adrenal support simultaneously.

    Adrenal insufficiency, especially when unmasked by the addition of thyroid hormone, is unpleasant and uncomfortable. To compound the problem, the doctor and patient then may wrongly assume that thyroid replacement has been a mistake. A tremendous opportunity for better health has now been missed.

    While uncomfortable, this dilemma can become a diagnostic tool. The doctor could then gradually add thyroid and adrenal hormone together, with the patient eventually taking optimal levels of both. This careful attention and delicate calibration are demanding on the practitioner and patient. Nevertheless, we have seen patient after patient dramatically improve with such dedication.

    Also, interactions among your hormones are sometimes as important as the direct action of the hormone itself. Some adrenal hormones assist in the conversion of T-4 to T-3 and perhaps assist in the final effect of T-3 on the tissues. Some scientists believe that even the entrance of thyroid hormone into our cells is under the influence of adrenal hormones. Thus, if your adrenal level is high enough, you might do well to take both adrenal and thyroid hormone together.

    ------------------------------



    (Her er et intervju Mary Shomon har gjort på www.thyroid-info.com med 'Drs. Shames' om dette temaet.)


    -----------------------------------------

    Her har jeg klippet fra en artikkel online;

    ADRENAL PROBLEMS (Replacement Cortisone Therapy)

    By Dr Barry Durrant-Peatfield MB, BS, LRCP, MRCS (forfatter av boken "The Great Thyroid Scandal" - se link lenger ned).


    The adrenals sit just above the kidneys and most of us have heard that these are responsible for the “fight or flight” reaction to stress. Briefly, there is a rapid increase of the glucocorticoids, to enable the body to cope. It is the failure of this mechanism to work properly, in the presence of general stress, or the stress of illness, that we are concerned with in the use of replacement cortisone therapy. We call this condition Low Adrenal Reserve, or simply, Adrenal Insufficiency.

    The most severe form of the syndrome is called "Addisons Disease", after the great Guys Physician, Thomas Addison, who was the first to describe it in 1855. It was then usually due to tuberculosis destroying the glands. Patients were dusky coloured, with terrible weakness, malnutrition, collapse and coldness, and the illness ran a fatal course. It is pretty rarely seen in clinical practice. But we are concerned with the mild form of deficiency, where the patient may be well, until subjected to stress and/or illness. Then, many of the symptoms may appear with prostration and collapse; or there may be level of insufficiency present all the time, with varying degrees of weakness, muscle and joint pains, and general ill health.

    So what do we look for in the way of symptoms? It is rarely clear cut, because the deficiency is so often part of another illness, and may therefore have something of the symptoms of both. We are particularly concerned with thyroid deficiency, which, if of longstanding, or fairly severe in degree, is most often associated with adrenal insufficiency, as well as a direct result of the stress on the system low thyroid function will cause.

    The patient will complain of weakness and episodes of prostration, frequently feeling quite unwell without being able to pinpoint the cause. Episodes of dizziness, sometimes cold sweats, caused by the blood sugar becoming abnormally low, are not uncommon. Often, an odd internal shivering is described. Aches and pains of a rheumatic nature are other frequent complaints. The patient often complains of the cold, and is likely to be cold to the touch. The subject does not feel well, and may look ill, with dark rings under the eyes, and a general pallor. There are likely to be digestive problems, with excessive wind and bloating, and bowel disturbances. The menstrual cycle may be disturbed, or absent and libido low. Depression and anxiety may also be a feature. Some of the symptoms complained of by patients with M.E. -- Myalgic Encephalitis -- are very similar, leading to the well-grounded suspicion that M.E. is associated with low adrenal reserve. Certainly, frequent minor illnesses are common, with an overlong course of quite minor infections, which may also have an unusually severe effect on the patient.

    Low thyroid function has some of these features, and it may be difficult to distinguish one from the other; In fact it should not be necessary because, as I pointed out above, as the two are often together, so too must the treatment overlap and be designed to relieve both.

    The complications of treating hypothyroid or underactive thyroid patients, is that their consequent poor adrenal reserve may become suddenly obvious, as soon as the thyroid is treated. The thyroid supplementation may, at worst, precipitate the adrenal problem; but what usually happens, is that the thyroid replacement may either not apparently work at all, or the patient may have thyroid over dosage symptoms on quite a low level of replacement. Hence, where low adrenal reserve is suspected, it is possibly dangerous, and certainly ill advised, to treat the patient without supplementation of the adrenals, in the manner explained further below.

  2. #2
    Medlem siden
    Apr 2005
    Sted
    Hordaland
    Alder
    59
    Meldinger
    802

    Standard

    Har skjønt at en del ikke leser engelsk så godt - så nå tenkte jeg at jeg skulle forsøke å oversette litt av teksten over her. Bær over med meg - jeg er ingen profesjonell oversetter! ;)

    1. SYMPTOMER

    Først noen sitater fra Mary Shomon's bok "Living Well with Hypothyroidism" (HarperResource, New York 2005 (2. utg.) - ISBN 0-06-074095-7 - paperback):

    - The Adrenal Connection eller Binyresammenhengen (side 240-43)

    En vanlig tilstand som ofte henger sammen med hypotyreose - og som til og med kan forhindre skikkelig behandling hvis den selv ikke behandles - er binyrebarkinsuffisiens, også kjent som binyretretthet ('adrenal exhaustion'/'adrenal fatigue').

    (...)

    Binyretretthet utvikles ofte etter perioder med intens eller langvarig fysisk eller emosjonelt stress, når overstimulering av kjertlene gjør dem ute av stand til å møte kroppens behov. (...) Vanlige symptomer er:

    • Overdreven utslitthet og utmattethet
      Ikke forfriskende søvn (du får tilstrekkelig mange timers søvn, men våkner trøtt)
      En følelse av ikke å bli restituert etter en hel natts søvn, eller søvnforstyrrelser
      Føler seg overveldet av eller ute av stand til å takle stressituasjoner
      Føler seg nedkjørt eller overveldet
      Salt- eller søthunger
      Føler seg mest energisk om kvelden
      Lav stamina, bruker lang tid på å komme seg etter trening
      Langsom restituering fra skader, sykdom eller stress
      Vansker med konsentrasjon, 'brain fog'
      Dårlig fordøyelse
      Dårlig immunforsvar
      Mat- eller miljøallergier
      PMS eller vanskeligheter i forbindelse med overgangsalder
      Vedvarende lavt blodtrykk
      Ekstrem følsomhet for kulde
      Manglende libido
      Mørke ringer under øynene
      Linjer med mørkt pigment i neglene
      Skvetter lett (lettskremt)
      Ingen motstandskraft ved konfrontasjoner


    Interessant nok er et av de mest vanlige symptomene, i følge noen behandlere, manglende respons på behandling med tyroksinerstatning hos mennesker med hypotyreose.

    På nettsiden sin - www.drrind.com - har dr. Bruce Rind, en ekspert på thyroidea-binyresammenhengen, et nyttig skjema som han kaller 'det metabolske skåringsskjemaet: symptommatrise' med mer informasjon om binyresymptomer. Dr. Rind opplever at hypotyreose og binyreproblemer er nært forbundne. Rind sier:

    Jeg har funnet ut at en de kraftigste stressorene for binyrene er thyroideahormoner (spesifikt T3). Kroppen er laget slik at under normale forhold vil ikke ett organ ødelegge et annet. Stoffskifteenergien får lov til å stige kun til et nivå som ikke vil skade binyrene. Dermed er det slik at i en stressituasjon vil binyrenes toleranse vanligvis synke, og vi ser en tilhørende nedgang i T3. Omvendt, hvis slitne binyrer nettopp har begynt å motta støtte (f.eks. næringsstoffer som er gunstige for binyrenes helse, drastisk reduksjon av stress, eller til og med en veldig gledelig situasjon) ser vi en rask økning av T3. Jeg opplever at de fleste som har hatt Graves sykdom eller Hashimotos thyreoiditt har svekkede binyrer. Dermed er effekten av stoffskiftebehandlingen begrenset av binyrenes helse.
    (...)


    -------------------------------------
    Her er det som står om det samme temaet i Richard L. Shames og Karilee Halo Shames' bok "Thyroid Power - 10 Steps to Total Health" (HarperResource, New York, 2002 (2. utg.) - ISBN 0-06-008222-4 - paperback):

    Thyroidea-/binyresammenhengen (s. 132)
    Det finnes en viktig sammenheng mellom lavt stoffskifte og lav binyre(funksjon). Lav binyrefunksjon, også kalt binyrebarkinsuffisiens, kan faktisk gjøre en persons stoffskifteproblem mye verre enn det ellers ville vært.

    Viktige grunner til å kjenne dine binyrenivåer (s. 133-134)
    Symptomer på binyrebarkinsuffisiens: Svakhet, manglende libido, allergier, mørke ringer under øynene, muskel- og leddsmerter, svimmelhet, lavt blodtrykk, lavt blodsukker, mat- og salthunger, dårlig søvn, tørr hud, cystiske bryster, linjer av mørkt pigment i neglene, vanskeligheter med å komme seg etter stressorer som forkjølelser eller jetlag, ingen motstandskraft ved konfrontasjoner, tendens til å skvette lett, senket immunfunksjon, angst, depresjon, og for tidlig aldring. Noen av disse symptomene ligner på symptomer på lavt stoffskifte.

    Hvis mennesker med lavt stoffskifte med slike symptomer får bare tyroksin, reagerer de av og til negativt. De har kanskje samtidig skjult lav binyrefunksjon. Hvis de tar bare tyroksin, kan den resulterende økte metabolismen akselerere problemet med lav binyrefunksjon. Den korrekte tilnærmingen i dette tilfellet er å behandle pasienten med støtte for stoffskifte og binyrer samtidig.

    Binyrebarkinsuffisiens er ubehagelig og ukomfortabelt, særlig når det blir avslørt ved tilskudd av tyroksin. For å vanskeliggjøre problemet, kan det tenkes at lege og pasient dermed feilaktig går ut fra at tyroksinerstatning har vært feil. En enorm mulighet for bedre helse har dermed gått en forbi.

    Selv om det er ubehagelig kan dette dilemmaet bli et diagnostisk redskap. Legen kan gradvis øke mengden stoffskifte- og binyrehormoner sammen, slik at pasienten til slutt får optimale mengder av begge. En slik årvåken oppmerksomhet og varsom kalibrering er krevende både for behandler og pasient. Ikke desto mindre har vi sett pasient etter pasient bli dramatisk bedre med slik dedikasjon.

    I tillegg er interaksjoner mellom hormonene dine noen ganger like viktig som den direkte virkningen av selve hormonet. Noen binyrehormoner hjelper til med konversjonen av T4 til T3, og hjelper kanskje til i den endelige effekten av T3 på vevene. Noen forskere tror til og med at stoffskiftehormonenes evne til å trenge inn i cellene våre påvirkes av binyrehormoner. Hvis binyrefunksjonen din (ikke?) er høy nok, har du antakelig godt av å ta både binyre- og stoffskiftehormoner sammen.

    ------------------------------


    Her er et intervju Mary Shomon har gjort på www.thyroid-info.com med 'Drs. Shames' om dette temaet (på engelsk).


    -----------------------------------------

    Her har jeg klippet fra en artikkel online;

    ADRENAL PROBLEMS (Replacement Cortisone Therapy) - BINYREPROBLEMER (erstatningsbehandling med cortison).

    Av dr. Barry Durrant-Peatfield MB, BS, LRCP, MRCS (forfatter av boken "The Great Thyroid Scandal" - se link lenger opp).

    Binyrene er plassert rett over nyrene og de fleste av oss har hørt at de er ansvarlige for 'fight-or-flight'(røm-eller-slåss)-reaksjonen på stress. Kort sagt er dette en rask økning av glukokortikoidene, som setter kroppen i stand til å takle situasjonen. Det er de tilfellene hvor denne mekanismen ikke virker som den skal når vi opplever generelt stress, eller stress på grunn av sykdom, vi er opptatt av når vi bruker erstatningsbehandling med cortison. Vi kaller tilstanden lav binyrereserve, eller binyrebarkinsuffisiens.

    Den mest alvorlige formen av dette syndromet kalles Addisons sykdom, etter den store Guys-legen Thomas Addison, som var den første som beskrev sykdommen i 1855. Den gangen skyldtes den vanligvis at tuberkulose ødela kjertlene. Pasientene hadde en sykelig hudfarge, med forferdelig svakhet, underernæring, kollaps og lav temperatur, og sykdommen hadde en dødelig utgang. Den sees ganske sjelden i klinisk praksis. Men vi er opptatt av den milde formen for insuffisiens, hvor pasienten kan være frisk til han/hun utsettes for stress og/eller sykdom. Da kan mange av symptomene opptre, med kraftløshet og kollaps; eller det kan være en grad av insuffisiens tilstede hele tiden, med varierende grad av svakhet, muskel- og leddsmerter, og generelt dårlig helse.

    Så hva ser vi etter når det gjelder symptomer? Det er sjelden helt likefram fordi mangeltilstanden så ofte er del av en annen sykdom, og man derfor kan ha en del symptomer på begge deler. Vi er særlig opptatt av lavt stoffskifte, som, dersom det har vart lenge eller er av mer alvorlig grad, oftest er assosiert med binyrebarkinsuffisiens, i tillegg til det direkte resultat av belastningen på systemet som lavt stoffskifte vil medføre.

    Pasienten vil klage over svakhet og episoder med kraftløshet, og vil ofte føle seg ganske uvel uten å kunne sette fingeren på grunnen. Episoder med svimmelhet, noen ganger kaldsvette, på grunn av at blodsukkeret har blitt unormalt lavt, er ikke uvanlig. Ofte beskrives en merkelig indre skjelving. Verking og smerter av reumatisk art er andre vanlige klagemål. Pasienten klager ofte over kulde, og er trolig kald å ta på. Personen føler seg ikke vel og ser kanskje syk ut, med mørke ringer under øynene og en generell blekhet. Der er gjerne fordøyelsesproblemer, med mye luft og oppblåsthet, og tarmforstyrrelser. Menssyklusen kan være forstyrret eller fraværende, og med lav libido. Depresjon og angst kan også være tilstede. Noen av symptomene pasienter med ME (myalgisk encephalitt) klager over, er veldig like, noe som leder til en velbegrunnet mistanke om at ME henger sammen med lav binyrereserve. Det er ganske sikkert hyppige tilfeller av mindre alvorlig sykdom, med en lang historie av småinfeksjoner, som også kan ha en uvanlig alvorlig effekt på pasienten.

    Lavt stoffskifte har noen av de samme trekkene, og det kan være vanskelig å skille det ene fra det andre; faktisk skal det ikke være nødvendig fordi, som jeg påpekte over, siden de to ofte henger sammen må behandlingen også overlappe og legges opp til å bedre begge tilstander.

    Komplikasjonene ved å behandle hypotyreote eller pasienter med underaktivt stoffskifte, er at deres medfølgende dårlige binyrereserve kan bli åpenbar plutselig, så snart stoffskiftet behandles. Tyroksinbehandlingen kan i verste fall føre til et binyreproblem; men det som vanligvis skjer er at tyroksinbehandlingen tilsynelatende ikke virker i det hele tatt, eller at pasienten kan få overdosesymptomer på ganske lavt nivå av medisinen. Når man mistenker lav binyrereserve er det derfor muligens farlig, og i hvert fall frarådelig, å behandle pasienten uten å behandle binyrene, på en måte som forklares nærmere nedenfor.


  3. #3
    Medlem siden
    Mar 2009
    Sted
    Sverige
    Alder
    74
    Meldinger
    2,323

    Arrow Sv: Binyre symptomer

    Sitat Opprinnelig skrevet av kris Vis post
    -----------------------------------------

    Her har jeg klippet fra en artikkel online;

    ADRENAL PROBLEMS (Replacement Cortisone Therapy) - BINYREPROBLEMER (erstatningsbehandling med cortison).

    Binyrene er plassert rett over nyrene og de fleste av oss har hørt at de er ansvarlige for 'fight-or-flight'(røm-eller-slåss)-reaksjonen på stress. Kort sagt er dette en rask økning av glukokortikoidene, som setter kroppen i stand til å takle situasjonen. Det er de tilfellene hvor denne mekanismen ikke virker som den skal når vi opplever generelt stress, eller stress på grunn av sykdom, vi er opptatt av når vi bruker erstatningsbehandling med cortison. Vi kaller tilstanden lav binyrereserve, eller binyrebarkinsuffisiens.

    Den mest alvorlige formen av dette syndromet kalles Addisons sykdom, etter den store Guys-legen Thomas Addison, som var den første som beskrev sykdommen i 1855. Den gangen skyldtes den vanligvis at tuberkulose ødela kjertlene. Pasientene hadde en sykelig hudfarge, med forferdelig svakhet, underernæring, kollaps og lav temperatur, og sykdommen hadde en dødelig utgang. Den sees ganske sjelden i klinisk praksis. Men vi er opptatt av den milde formen for insuffisiens, hvor pasienten kan være frisk til han/hun utsettes for stress og/eller sykdom. Da kan mange av symptomene opptre, med kraftløshet og kollaps; eller det kan være en grad av insuffisiens tilstede hele tiden, med varierende grad av svakhet, muskel- og leddsmerter, og generelt dårlig helse.

    Så hva ser vi etter når det gjelder symptomer? Det er sjelden helt likefram fordi mangeltilstanden så ofte er del av en annen sykdom, og man derfor kan ha en del symptomer på begge deler. Vi er særlig opptatt av lavt stoffskifte, som, dersom det har vart lenge eller er av mer alvorlig grad, oftest er assosiert med binyrebarkinsuffisiens, i tillegg til det direkte resultat av belastningen på systemet som lavt stoffskifte vil medføre.

    Pasienten vil klage over svakhet og episoder med kraftløshet, og vil ofte føle seg ganske uvel uten å kunne sette fingeren på grunnen. Episoder med svimmelhet, noen ganger kaldsvette, på grunn av at blodsukkeret har blitt unormalt lavt, er ikke uvanlig. Ofte beskrives en merkelig indre skjelving. Verking og smerter av reumatisk art er andre vanlige klagemål. Pasienten klager ofte over kulde, og er trolig kald å ta på. Personen føler seg ikke vel og ser kanskje syk ut, med mørke ringer under øynene og en generell blekhet. Der er gjerne fordøyelsesproblemer, med mye luft og oppblåsthet, og tarmforstyrrelser. Menssyklusen kan være forstyrret eller fraværende, og med lav libido. Depresjon og angst kan også være tilstede. Noen av symptomene pasienter med ME (myalgisk encephalitt) klager over, er veldig like, noe som leder til en velbegrunnet mistanke om at ME henger sammen med lav binyrereserve. Det er ganske sikkert hyppige tilfeller av mindre alvorlig sykdom, med en lang historie av småinfeksjoner, som også kan ha en uvanlig alvorlig effekt på pasienten.

    Lavt stoffskifte har noen av de samme trekkene, og det kan være vanskelig å skille det ene fra det andre; faktisk skal det ikke være nødvendig fordi, som jeg påpekte over, siden de to ofte henger sammen må behandlingen også overlappe og legges opp til å bedre begge tilstander.

    Komplikasjonene ved å behandle hypotyreote eller pasienter med underaktivt stoffskifte, er at deres medfølgende dårlige binyrereserve kan bli åpenbar plutselig, så snart stoffskiftet behandles. Tyroksinbehandlingen kan i verste fall føre til et binyreproblem; men det som vanligvis skjer er at tyroksinbehandlingen tilsynelatende ikke virker i det hele tatt, eller at pasienten kan få overdosesymptomer på ganske lavt nivå av medisinen. Når man mistenker lav binyrereserve er det derfor muligens farlig, og i hvert fall frarådelig, å behandle pasienten uten å behandle binyrene, på en måte som forklares nærmere nedenfor.

    Av dr. Barry Durrant-Peatfield MB, BS, LRCP, MRCS (forfatter av boken "The Great Thyroid Scandal" - se link lenger opp).
    Lenke ikke lenger aktiv, men vi har funnet artikkelen igjen via hjemmesiden til Nora.
    All hjelp til oversetting mottas med takk!

    CORTISONE REPLACEMENT IN THE LOW ADRENAL RESERVE SYNDROME

    by Dr Barry J Durrant-Peatfield
    M.B., B.S., L.R.C.P., M.R.C.S.

    THE CLINIC
    86 Foxley Lane Purley
    SURREY CR2 3EE
    Telephone - 020 8660 0905


    Cortisone therapy was first brought to the world of medicine in the thirties, by the work of Hench & Kendal. By the late forties, and early fifties, cortisone was hailed as a medical breakthrough in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis,and similar illnesses, asthma, and as a lifesaver in the management of surgical shock. Yet, within a few years, doctors and patients alike, became fearful of its use; an anxiety which persists very much today, thus denying many people enormous benefits.

    The problem lay in dosage. Really quite large doses were given - and sometimes are today - which caused various side effects. The swelling and puffiness of the face; weight gain, osteoporosis, peptic ulceration, bruising, fluid retention are generally quite well known. Yet these occur only in doses way above the natural levels of cortisone in the body; what we may call "pharmacological" doses. This collection of symptoms - or syndrome - occurs in nature when the adrenals become seriously overactive; this is called Cushings Syndrome.

    What was not realised until quite a lot later, and regrettably in some quarters still today, is that cortisone in small amounts, used as replacement therapy, for deficiency, can be of extraordinary benefit, and cause no side effects of any kind. This is the use of cortisone replacement therapy in physiological doses, when the side effect problem no longer applies. The use of a cortisone derivative in your treatment is in this way; to correct a deficiency, brought about by low adrenal function.

    The adrenals sit just above the kidneys in the loin, one on each side. Their tasks are many and varied; and are so important, that if you lose your adrenals, you die within three days. The inside of each adrenal produces adrenalin, which is the hormone that gives us a sudden burst of energy or strength when confronted with a crisis situation - the "fight or flight" scenario. It is the rim, or cortex, of each adrenal, that most concerns us for the present. It produces a number of complex hormones with vital roles to play, and are essential in the system's response to prolonged stress; e.g. infection, injury, starvation, massive exertion. The first group is the glucocorticoids (mostly hydrocortisone), whose job is mostly to stimulate conversion of protein to glucose; and maintain the tone of the vascular (or blood vessels) system.

    The second group comprises the mineral corticoids, which regulate the proper balance in the body of sodium and potassium, and are therefore to do with fluid retention and blood pressure. Aldosterone is the chief. The third type are the androgens, (male sex hormones), and are represented by Dehydroepiandrosterone, (DHEA for short), and androstendione. These have as their main job, the promotion of repair and growth in the tissues.

    Fourthly, are the oestrogen's, that back up the oestrogen made by the ovaries - as, for example, in the menopause. Other hormones are suspected, but not yet isolated. The output of these hormones is cyclical, with maximum level early in the morning, and least at night.

    Our deepest concern here, is the crucial importance of the adrenal cortex hormones in the system's response to stress. Briefly, there is a rapid increase of the glucocorticoids, to enable the body to cope. It is the failure of this mechanism to work properly, in the presence of general stress, or the stress of illness, that we are concerned with in the use of replacement cortisone therapy.

    This condition we call Low Adrenal Reserve, or simply, Adrenal Insufficiency. The most severe form of the syndrome is called "Addisons Disease", after the great Guys Physician, Thomas Addison, who was the first to describe it in 1855.

    It was then usually due to tuberculosis destroying the glands. Patients were dusky coloured, with terrible weakness, malnutrition, collapse and coldness, and the illness ran a fatal course. It is pretty rarely seen in clinical practice. But we are concerned with the mild form of deficiency, where the patient may be well, until subjected to stress and/or illness. Then, many of the symptoms may appear with prostration and collapse; or there may be a level of insufficiency present all the time, with varying degrees of weakness, muscle and joint pains, and general ill health.

    So what do we look for in the way of symptoms? It is rarely clear cut, because the deficiency is so often part of another illness, and may therefore have something of the symptoms of both. We are particularly concerned with thyroid deficiency, which, if of longstanding, or fairly severe in degree, is most often associated with adrenal insufficiency, as well as a direct result of the stress on the system low thyroid function will cause.

    The patient will complain of weakness and episodes of prostration, frequently feeling quite unwell without being able to pinpoint the cause. Episodes of dizziness, sometimes cold sweats, caused by the blood sugar becoming abnormally low, are not uncommon. Often, an odd internal shivering is described. Aches and pains of a rheumatic nature are other frequent complaints. The patient often complains of the cold, and is likely to be cold to the touch. The subject does not feel well, and may look ill, with dark rings under the eyes, and a general pallor. There are likely to be digestive problems, with excessive wind and bloating, and bowel disturbances. The menstrual cycle may be disturbed, or absent; libidos low. Depression and anxiety may also be a feature.

    Some of the symptoms complained of by patients with M.E. - Myalgic Encephalitis - are very similar, leading to the well grounded suspicion that M.E. is associated with low adrenal reserve. Certainly, frequent minor illnesses are common, with an overlong course of quite minor infections, which may also have an unusually severe effect on the patient.

    Low thyroid function has some of these features, and it may be difficult to distinguish one from the other; In fact it should not be necessary because, as I pointed out above, as the two are often together, so too must the treatment overlap and be designed to relieve both.

    The complications of treating hypothyroid or under active thyroid patients) is that their consequent poor adrenal reserve may become suddenly obvious, as soon as the thyroid is treated. The thyroid supplementation may, at worst, precipitate the adrenal problem; but what usually happens, is that the thyroid replacement may either not apparently work at all, or the patient may have thyroid overdosage symptoms on quite a low level of replacement. Hence, where low adrenal reserve is suspected, it is possibly dangerous, and certainly ill advised, to treat the patient without supplementation of the adrenals, in the manner explained further below.

    If a high index of suspicion of adrenal insufficiency is raised by the history given by the patient, then what are the signs the doctor looks for to establish the diagnosis?

    Actually, it is sometimes difficult where the problem is not particularly severe; but there are some pointers. The blood pressure is usually quite low, often very strikingly so. The difference between the lying, (or sitting) blood pressure, and the standing one, may be very important. Normally, it rises when the patient stands. In low adrenal reserve, it either does not change at all, or lowers further. The pupil reflex is slow, or unstable, or even reversed, to bright light. Reflexes may be abnormal, especially the Achilles reflex - in the heel. The heart sound is characteristically altered.

    It is satisfactory to confirm the clinical impression by blood tests; but these sometimes are unhelpful. The level of cortisone in the blood may be measured, but it is widely variable. However, DHEA, mentioned above, is quite a good indicator of adrenal cortex function. The urinary excretion of adrenal hormones is an excellent indicator - but the practical problems, (it has to be over 24 hours), and the expense of really good laboratory analysis, tend to limit this test to hospital inpatients. It is, in our view, perfectly practical and reasonable, to establish the diagnosis on clinical grounds, and because the therapy given is of very low - physiological - doses, there is no possible risk to the patient, however long it is needed. In a very large number of cases, the adrenal insufficiency may right itself over two or three months, making further supplementation unnecessary.


    The Treatment

    You will be given hydrocortisone 10mgm, which is the natural form, to take in a dose appropriate to your needs. Half a tablet three or four times a day is usual, later to be increased, if required. Hydrocortisone has the problem of very rapid uptake by the system, and it needs to be given every four hours, at least. This creates practical problems for many patients, and we use more often, Deltacortril, or Prednisolone. 2.5mgm is usually given to start with, increasing to 5mgm after a few days. Rarely, a total dose of 7.5mgm may be required.

    Most patients feel benefit within a few days. You will be asked to ring the surgery if you are in the slightest doubt about how you feel, or how things are going. Are port by phone after a week is pretty important, and then we see you in two or three further weeks to assess matters. You will probably have been asked to keep a diary of events. If you have a thyroid problem, the thyroid replacement will start after a week, at a very low dose, working slowly upwards.

    It sometimes takes many weeks for all the benefits to come through, but some improvement is clear within a week or so. Adrenal insufficiency related to low thyroid function corrects itself, as the thyroid levels improve, and usually after, two, three or four months, have recovered sufficiently for the cortisone therapy to be stopped.

    The question is often asked. Will the cortisone replacement suppress my adrenals? The answer is that in physiological doses it does not at all; and in any event, the adrenal activity is curtailed anyway, making the options quite clear. Suppression occurs in the superpharmalogical doses, which do not concern us in this context. Even then, the adrenals are able to recover if the primary illness is dealt with, and the dose reduced gradually.

    Low adrenal reserve means that under a state of challenge, the problem is going to show. While on replacement treatment therefore, any further illness and stress is best dealt with by a temporary increase of dose. Influenza, heavy colds, dental extraction, injury and the like, require, for example, the 5 mgm Deltacortril to be doubled, just for a few days. (I find that a 5mgm dose almost completely prevents jet lag; and influenza is over in one or two days.)

    We have now a considerable fund of practical experience in the treatment of the adrenal deficiency syndrome, and are very much aware of its great benefit. It should not be considered in isolation, however, any may well be part of the management of other deficiencies. The ageing process is the result of deficiency in a number of different aspects of the system; so that full benefit may not be gained until both nutritional and hormonal imbalances are looked for and corrected.

    During the time we are assessing your medical problem, we will include all that I have been talking about, as well as those aspects related to the menopausal situation, both for men and women.
    Til alle norske og danske stoffskifte-pasienter, anbefaler vi boken STOP stofskiftevanviddet, skrevet av verdens ledende pasient-aktivist Janie Bowthorpe, som i 2005 grunnla nettstedet Stop The Thyroid Madness. Boken er utgitt på dansk i 2014. För alla svenska hypotyreos-patienter, rekommenderar vi samma bok, översatt till svenska med titeln Stoppa sköldkörtelskandalen (2012). Til alle gode leger, og pasienter som ønsker å lære mer av "the right stuff", anbefaler vi boken Stop The Thyroid Madness II (2014) med bidrag fra 10 leger MD. I Skandinavia, definitivt de to beste og mest nyttige bøker for hypotyreose-pasienter, for deres familier og venner, og for deres leger.

Lignende tråder

  1. Binyre-ekstrakt
    Av AneMarie i forumet Diverse relatert til helse og sykdom
    Svar: 0
    Siste melding: 16-01-11, 19:43
  2. Binyre-venlige urter
    Av Anisa i forumet Adrenal Fatique - tilstanden sekundær til lavt stoffskifte
    Svar: 2
    Siste melding: 27-07-10, 22:02
  3. Binyre vennlig sjokolade
    Av Anisa i forumet Adrenal Fatique - tilstanden sekundær til lavt stoffskifte
    Svar: 2
    Siste melding: 15-12-09, 13:01
  4. Link til binyre-trøtthet info!
    Av Thomas W H i forumet Adrenal Fatique - tilstanden sekundær til lavt stoffskifte
    Svar: 0
    Siste melding: 05-08-09, 11:33

Bokmerker

Regler for innlegg

  • Du kan ikke starte nye tråder
  • Du kan ikke svare på innlegg / tråder
  • Du kan ikke laste opp vedlegg
  • Du kan ikke redigere meldingene dine
  •  

Logg inn

Logg inn